Shoeing my 2 year old colt

I have a 2 year-old APHA Colt that had a nasty run in with a farrier when he was 10 months old. I don't know if his "problem" has something to do with it, but the farrier put a chain over his upper gums to force him to allow his feet to be ...I have a 2 year-old APHA Colt that had a nasty run in with a farrier when he was 10 months old. I don't know if his "problem" has something to do with it, but the farrier put a chain over his upper gums to force him to allow his feet to be ...

Story originally posted by: Maggie Flowers

Hello

I have a 2 year-old APHA Colt that had a nasty run in with a farrier when he was 10 months old. I don’t know if his "problem" has something to do with it, but the farrier put a chain over his upper gums to force him to allow his feet to be trimmed. I was not present at the time, but I constantly work with his feet and legs to attempt to settle him into having his feet routinely checked.

My "problem" is that my colt refuses to accept his feet being worked with and tries to kick, etc. He has improved drastically with his front feet, but I seem to be getting nowhere with his hind feet. Later this summer I will be starting to ride him lightly, but due to uneven foot wear (from his pacing) I need to have him shod. Do you have any suggestions that may assist me in settling him into the shoeing process so that I don’t have to have him tranquilized to have his feet done?

Please help,
Thanks,
Rachel Reinhardt
Carson City, Nevada

Hello Rachel,

Unfortunately undoing a mishap such as this will only take time – hard, patient time. Another thing in a situation such as yours, don’t be fooled to the possibility that his colt is using this human given excuse to get away with his little antics. A firm disciplinarian rule must be used here.

Sure you understand the experience the colt had with the farrier at age ten months perhaps could be judged as harsh from your point of view, but frankly, you weren’t there to see what really happened. Furthermore, it is not unusual for some farriers to take this kind of precaution when it comes to a stud colt.

You have stated that you have made some progress … just keep at. You’re doing fine, but don’t be afraid to show this opportunist of a colt, who’s boss. Firm but positive correction when necessary never hurt anyone or any equine friend.

Maggie Flowers