Carol, Tony and Monopoly

I am a 17 year old girl from Phoenix, AZ. My horse is a six year old registered purebred Arabian gelding named BMR Monopoly. He is a gorgeous reddish bay with a long silky mane and a tail that goes on for miles. He has the classic ...I am a 17 year old girl from Phoenix, AZ. My horse is a six year old registered purebred Arabian gelding named BMR Monopoly. He is a gorgeous reddish bay with a long silky mane and a tail that goes on for miles. He has the classic ...

Story originally posted by Horsecity.com Staff

I am a 17 year old girl from Phoenix, AZ. My horse is a six year old registered purebred Arabian gelding named BMR Monopoly. He is a gorgeous reddish bay with a long silky mane and a tail that goes on for miles. He has the classic Arab neck and high tail carriage and when he moves it’s sheer beauty in motion. He has this "look at me" disposition. He loves to be a clown and make people laugh and if you aren’t paying attention to him, well, he’s gonna do something about it. I think he could do anything and I have big dreams for him and me. But our story goes back several years. . .

My beloved Appaloosa, Tony was my lifeline and he saved my life. I was literally ready to kill myself (don’t be alarmed, I’m fine now) but because of him and a very special man who helped us, I didn’t. Then I lost him. He was stolen from me by selfish people who knew how much he meant to me. We have never gotten him back.

I thought my life was over. But God sent another angel. Arthur got me riding again, gave me riding lessons and horses to ride without asking for payment (I would never have been able to afford them otherwise), but I still thought I could never love another horse. One day Arthur told me about this horse he had, a young horse, still green, needed a rider, someone to finish him. His name was Monopoly. So I started riding him. At first I didn’t like him. He was hard to handle and the greenest horse I’d ever ridden. After a while we came to tolerate each other. The barn was going to a mini-circuit show so I decided to take Monopoly to see how he would act. So I took him.

Let’s just say it was an experience. He bucked, he bolted, he shied from the announcer’s stand and we almost ran over the judge. My determination increased. I was going to succeed at this. Tolerance turned to understanding. Understanding turned to love and at our second show Monopoly was calm and business like. We won three ribbons and, although we weren’t perfect, it was a definite improvement over the first time. We were riding back to the trailer and we were met by a thoughtful Arthur. As I dismounted, Arthur asked me if I was happy with Monopoly. I was beaming and announce that I was thrilled with him. Arthur called my mom over and told us both that if I liked Monopoly, he would give him to me, free. Well, the tears started to fall.

I turned and hugged Monopoly and hugged Arthur and ran to tell my friend who was with her own horse. I cannot explain the feeling. It took me days to get over the disbelief. Now Monopoly and I are doing better then ever, getting ready for our next show. This is a true exemplification of the oh-so-accurate statement "There is nothing better for the inside of a person then the outside of a horse." As someone else said, "17 with a dream horse, unbelievable". I love Monopoly more then anything else in my world and he has helped me get over the pain of losing Tony and he has made my life so much better just by being in it! Horses have a way of creeping into your heart and taking it over with their big soft, understanding eyes, listening ears, compassion, and unconditional love and understanding. They never hurt your feelings, or tell you it’s not enough, or turn you away when you need a shoulder to cry on. They are always there, quiet, patient, understanding.

They aren’t cruel or selfish. They just want to love and be loved and just their presence in a life can make it that much better. I’ve been riding since I was 11, so that makes six years. Horses have gotten me through when life make it hard on me and I would rather be at the barn then anywhere. I can honestly say I would have survived life this far if it weren’t for horses.

I also must say a word of gratitude to the two men mentioned herein the first being John, the second Arthur, and a third unmentioned but no less important and certainly no less appreciated Ponch, all of whom have also made my life a better one.

Carol
Phoenix, Arizona