Novice rider, experienced horse

My dad recently bought me an experienced horse, but every time I go to brush him or saddle him or even go to mount him he freaks if some one else is around. But as soon as they're gone he's as good as gold. I don't know what to do. My ...My dad recently bought me an experienced horse, but every time I go to brush him or saddle him or even go to mount him he freaks if some one else is around. But as soon as they're gone he's as good as gold. I don't know what to do. My ...

Story originally posted by: Maggie Flowers

Hi,

My dad recently bought me an experienced horse, but every time I go to brush him or saddle him or even go to mount him he freaks if some one else is around. But as soon as they’re gone he’s as good as gold. I don’t know what to do. My trainer won’t leave me alone with him because he’s a "stallion". Please help me, I need some advise from another trainer instead of the one I’ve got because he doesn’t listen to what I tell him. He doesn’t believe me when I tell him that my horse is fine when he’s gone. So please help and e-mail any thoughts to me.

Thank you:
Ashley and her lovely horse Drifter

Hello Ashley,

I am sure that your trainer is just looking out for your safety. After all he is hired to out for your best interest and protect himself from any incident that may prove negative to his reputation as an instructor/trainer. He knows that it is highly unusual and questionable to place a stallion under a young novice rider. Relax — safety first whenever around horses.

As to your horse, I can’t presume to know exactly what cause your horse to behavior in such a disagreeable manner other than out of experience. You didn’t mention your horse’s age, but if he has ever been used as a stud his behavior may stem from that experience.

When a stallion is studded out, either to breed naturally to a mare or in a semen-catch with a dummy mount, there are always at least 2 people to handle the stallion. One to handle the lead rope and the other who oversees that the process of breeding so it is not injurious to either the mare or the stallion himself. In some cases the stallion associates a second person with someone who is there to assist in a breeding, thus, the stallion begins to look around in anticipation and his hormones begin to escalate presenting you with the behavior he displays with your instructor/trainer around.

Keep this in mind when you’re in the presence of a mare that maybe is in ‘heat’. Remember that riding a stallion is not without the possibility of an incident occurring. You should educate you stallion to have extremely exceptional manners, more so than any other gender horses, when in public and while being ridden. Not all stallions can adapt themselves to this kind of human control. It is very rare for a stallion to possess this "gentlemanly" willing attitude.

So …don’t get annoyed at your instructor/trainer, he is doing his job. Be careful and good luck.

Maggie Flowers
Equine Trainer/Advisor