Bilateral Bridging

In June I was giving a 3 week old foal. I knew he had a long road ahead of him but wanted to give him every chance to be normal and happy and not in pain. He was a foal that was born with crooked legs.In June I was giving a 3 week old foal. I knew he had a long road ahead of him but wanted to give him every chance to be normal and happy and not in pain. He was a foal that was born with crooked legs.

Story originally posted by: Michael Lowder, DVM, MS

Hi,

In June I was giving a 3 week old foal. I knew he had a long road ahead of him but wanted to give him every chance to be normal and happy and not in pain. He was a foal that was born with crooked legs. My first stop was to my local vet to get a refferal to the University.

He had a bilateral bridging done to both front legs above the knee. One leg was at 7 degrees and the other at 14. I spent 31 days hand walking him and keeping him quiet (not an easy chore) the screws came out on the 31st day. All xrays show that he is straight and all the bones are lining up but I am still concerned because his left leg at the bottom still toes out.

The vet said that he had wore the hoof on the inside so the inside needed to catch up with the outside I started weekly shaving of the outside hoof (as insructed). I feel there is some improvement but slow. I was told that the knee will rotate the bottom part of the leg when the hoof grows out properly. How long is to long to wait for this correction!

Not getting any straight answers, they hust keep telling me to be patient and quit worrying. It has been 3 months since removal of the pins the right leg seem fine the left leg still has a ways to go. Was also told this was not genetic but brought on by the sire being to large for the mare and the baby didn’t have a lot of room. He is a very large QH … at 5 months weighs in at 520 lbs.

Lane and Oletta Lewis

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis:

I would tend to think that if things are not right now that they will improve little. Having said that, you might be surprised what a little corrective shoeing will do.

One thing to remember is not to feed him to much too soon. Fast growth equals leg problems!.

You have done all you can do at this point and time is the only treatment you have.

Thanks,
Dr. Lowder