Looking for Mr. Good Horse

When it comes time to go horse shopping, make a detailed shopping list and then stick to it!
There are many factors you can consider when buying a horse. I've listed them here in their order of importance - in my opinion...When it comes time to go horse shopping, make a detailed shopping list and then stick to it!
There are many factors you can consider when buying a horse. I've listed them here in their order of importance - in my opinion...

Story originally posted by: Cherry Hill

When it comes time to go horse shopping, make a detailed shopping list and then stick to it!

There are many factors you can consider when buying a horse. I’ve listed them here in their order of importance – in my opinion:
Price
Temperament

Manners
Soundness
Health
Movement and Comfort of Gaits

Level of Training
Sex
Conformation

Breed or type
Age
Performance

Accomplishments
Breeding
Performance
Size Quality
Pedigree
Blemishes
Color and Markings
When setting your priorities and making your "shopping list" first determine why you want a horse. What do you want to use him for specifically? Will the horse be a trustworthy trail companion or a spectacular show jumper? A ranch partner or a broodmare? Your first-time training project or a solid mentor to teach you how to ride? Make a list of the attributes a horse must have. This will help determine your priorities.

When you have found a horse that seems to be a contender and is in your price range, arrange for a test ride. During the test ride and buyer exam, you should have a check list (small notebook is better than mental) of things you definitely want to check such as ease of picking out hooves, ease of mounting, comfort of gaits, is the horse head shy, barn sour, hard mouthed etc.

After the test ride, if the horse seems suitable for you, you’ll want to have the horse checked over by a veterinarian of your choice to see if the horse has an unsoundness or health problem that would rule him out.

When you ask for professional advice, pay for it and then listen to it! When your instructor or veterinarian cautions you about a horse, it is for a reason. Conversely, if you are given the "go-ahead" to buy and then you get cold feet, you may not find as good a horse again. When procuring advice, it is best to hire an objective professional rather than solicit recommendations from enthusiastic but equally inexperienced friends. Select a well-respected professional that has no vested interest in the horse sale.