Augusta Futurity open finals set to go

The open finals of the 22nd annual Augusta Futurity is set. Brad Mitchell, riding Tummys Little Jewel, is leading the pack. The Augusta Futurity, located in Augusta, Ga., is the top cutting event east of the Mississippi. It began Jan. 26 and will end with the open Futurity finals Feb. 3.The open finals of the 22nd annual Augusta Futurity is set. Brad Mitchell, riding Tummys Little Jewel, is leading the pack. The Augusta Futurity, located in Augusta, Ga., is the top cutting event east of the Mississippi. It began Jan. 26 and will end with the open Futurity finals Feb. 3.

Story originally posted by: John BrasseauxHorseCity.com Western Content Director

The open finals of the 22nd annual Augusta Futurity is set. Brad Mitchell, riding Tummys Little Jewel, is leading the pack. The Augusta Futurity, located in Augusta, Ga., is the top cutting event east of the Mississippi. It began Jan. 26 and will end with the open Futurity finals Feb. 3.

Mitchell, of Thompson Station, Tenn., a Nashville suburb, rode Tummys Little Jewel, a 4-year-old mare by Lenas Jewel Bars out of Oaks Tummy Tucker, to the top semi-final spot Feb. 1. He and the mare brilliantly handled their cattle to a mark of 219. That number by itself is not particularly spectacular, but considering the difficulty of the cattle, it was a great score. Sixteen others qualified for the finals, with the bump score settling at a 213. The Futurity champion will take home a check for nearly $21,000.

Tummys Little Jewel is owned by Skip Morrow of Hamilton, Ohio. He also owns the horse’s dam, Oaks Tummy Tucker, which he showed extensively when the horse was younger. Not only did Mitchell win the semifinals and the emotional lead going into the finals, but he won a check for $3,000. Overall, he’s having the best Augusta Futurity of his young professional career. The 30-year-old Mitchell turned pro three years ago.

"I’m just happy I’m in the final," he said. "I’ve lost cows every time I’ve been here. You know, it’s just an opportunity to make as much money as I can. I have as decent a chance as everybody else."

Should he win, it would qaulify as the biggest of his career. His father, Jim, of Danville, Ill., is a professional cutting horse trainer.

The non-pro finals will run before the open finals. For daily results and news, click on the Augusta Futurity icon located on the homepage of horsecity.com.

Check out up-to-the-minute scores of the 2001 Augusta Cutting Horse Futurity at: