mowing

Piles of Grass Clippings Are No Treat for Your Horse

Are you tempted to cut your grass, then rake it into soft, fragrant, tasty piles of clippings for your horse to nibble? According to equine nutrition expert Dr. Juliet Getty, this should be the last thing you encourage your horse to eat. It has to do with that extra step: raking.

Grass clippings that stay on the pasture after mowing, where they can dry in small amounts, are generally not a problem. But never gather them into piles to feed them to your horse. Here’s why:

  • Clippings are too easy to over-consume, and eating large amounts at one time can lead to excess fermentation in the hind gut, potentially causing colic and laminitis.
  • Piles of clippings can rapidly invite mold to form (especially prevalent in hot, humid environments), which can lead to colic.
  • Because there is no air inside a dense pile, botulism can develop, which turns this “treat” absolutely deadly.

Those are three really good reasons those pretty piles are no kind of treat for your horse!

Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. is an independent equine nutritionist with a wide U.S. and international following. Her research-based approach optimizes equine health by aligning physiology and instincts with correct feeding and nutrition practices. Getty’s comprehensive resource book, Feed Your Horse Like a Horse, is available at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com, www.Amazon.com or other online retail bookstores. Reach Getty directly at gettyequinenutrition@gmail.com.