Horse Barn Design: Not Just for Horse Comfort

Recently I had the opportunity to ask horse industry professionals what they like and need to have in "your" barn when they come to you as a service provider. Often when you build and design a barn people think aboutRecently I had the opportunity to ask horse industry professionals what they like and need to have in "your" barn when they come to you as a service provider. Often when you build and design a barn people think about

Story originally posted by: by Teresa Spencercaliforniahorsebarns.com

Recently I had the opportunity to ask horse industry professionals what they like and need to have in "your" barn when they come to you as a service provider. Often when you build and design a barn people think about what "they" want and sometimes forget about professionals who come to the barn for service visits.

Here are some things that would allow them to provide you best possible service:

Water and electricity

Both helpful for several reasons. They should be readily available and accessible when needed for things like X-rays, washing a wound, cooling off hot shoes for the farrier and general clean-up.

Level working surfaces

A level area where your horse can be either tied or cross-tied. The presence of rubber mats to allow dirt and debris to be cleaned away from the working area. Make sure the floor or ground is clear of rocks and manure before the professional arrives.

Shade or cover

If you live in an area that gets lots of rain, wind or sun, for the professionals benefit this is obvious. If you do not have an area that is level and shaded you may want to consider an umbrella, pop-up shade tent or move the horse to a shaded area to work.

Working area away from other horses or animals

Nothing can be more dangerous for the professional than if another horse is harassing the one being tended to. If a dog runs around a corner and the horse is startled then injuries may result.

Doors that have unobtrusive locks

Doors that have hooks or locks that clothing can get caught on can be very dangerous to the professionals and your horse. If the horse is to close to the door and gets the halter caught then everyone can be in danger. Just be aware that if you have latches with any type of hooked-end that you know where your horse and yourself are at all times.

Lighting

Lighting is very important if you are calling a vet out for a colic in the middle of the night. You and the vet need to be able to treat the horse, see what is happening and be safe while administering care to an ailing animal. You can have a professional electrician run lights to your barn or use free standing flood lights as long as they are securely fastened to something. Vehicle headlights or small bulbs that are too high to be effective are not always suitable for night-time visits and emergencies. Your farrier will also appreciate good lighting when visits fall during dark times of the day or natural light is not sufficient.

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About Teresa Spencer

Wife, mother, entrepreneur, inventor, barn sales consultant and project manager. Teresa’s core belief and goal is to give you quality service with a smile, a barn for what you need within your budget and for each client to be proud to own a barn of quality that is safe for their equines. Find her website here: www.californiahorsebarns.com and blog here: www.CaliforniaHorseBarns.wordpress.com